Holga Inspire

An Exhibition of Holga Photography


For Immediate Release: Contact: Tammy Cromer-Campbell

August 4, 2009 903.236.4686 •


TCC PHOTO | GALLERY is excited to announce the international Holga Inspire Exhibition up from September 3 - October 30. We are located at 207 N. Center St. Longview, TX. We invite you to view a collection of outstanding images created by acclaimed international photographers who use the toy plastic Holga camera as their preferred medium of artistic expression.


We are delighted to have this opportunity to inspire you with a selection of work by Holga's featured artists Michelle Bates, David Burnett, Tammy Cromer-Campbell, Taiju Fubuki, Teru Kuwayama, Pauline St Denis, Harvey Stein, and Rebecca Tolk, all of whom have attained international renown for their highly imaginative work created with Holga cameras.


This exhibit first was shown in Bangkok, Thailand at the Photo Imaging Expo 2009 April 1-5, 2009. The Thai Crown Princess was a part of the exhibit and visited the exhibition of Holga photography.


“At 5 o'clock sharp, the national anthem was played as the princess entered the hall. I have to admit that this was the most divine moment I have ever experienced.” explained Christine So of Holga Limited.


So continued, "The opportunity to exhibit suddenly came on the 19th of March at midnight, while Dr. Aran Hansuebsai, Head of the Department of Imaging and Printing Technology at Bangkok's Chulalongkorn University told us that we could participate in an exhibition in conjunction with the photo exhibition of Princess Sirindhorn during the Photo Imaging Expo in Bangkok. This event is definitely one of the most high profile photography events in Thailand. After the phone call, we immediately sent emails to our featured photographers asking if they were interested in participating in the event. Overnight, we got all positive replies from the artists and we started planning the printing preferences, shipping issues, etc. And you can't simply stick the pictures on the wall without framing them, and information in Thai was required for the show." Read Christine So's report and see the picture, click here.


About Holga


Holga is a medium format film camera created by T M Lee, co-founder of Universal Electronics, which has been manufacturing it since 1982. The Holga earned worldwide recognition thanks to its unique low-fidelity aesthetics. Countless professional photographers, artists and photography enthusiasts around the world have been captivated by the mysterious magic of Holga.


The unpredictability of the signature light leaks captures the imagination, invigorates the senses and eternally surprises. The metamorphosis brought about by the light flares, vignetting and often uneven edges creates images of an unmistakable character.


A fine art photography initiative of Holga Limited,

member of the Universal Electronics Industries group.

“Created by the people who created the Holga”


Holga Created Holga Inspire

"While the Holga has gained immense popularity with young and old devotees of photography worldwide, the Holga Inspire initiative finds its mission in supporting the use of the Holga as a means of unique creative expression by fine art photographers, photography professionals, journalists and academics. Together with the artists we seek to widen the appeal of their work, and inspire new generations of photographers through exhibitions, events and educational programs. Our goal is to revive and cultivate an interest in classic photography and to rekindle a sense of hand-crafted creative originality in this ever changing digitalized world. Holga Inspire strives to highlight the extraordinary artistic potential and the immense range of creative possibilities that Holga brings to photography." The Holga Team: T M Lee, Christine So, and Don Knodt.

http://www.holgainspire.com


Michelle Bates

“I found my inspiration in photography with a Holga camera in 1991. I created a look that continues to be the centerpiece of my fine-art photography to this day. The quirkiness that I embraced as a Holga photographer has informed the rest of my photography. “


Frequently referred to as the “Holga Queen” due to her imaginative applications using a Holga and her expert knowledge, Michelle Bates is an author, educator, and a leading “toy” camera photographer. Her book “Plastic Cameras: Toying with Creativity” is widely recognized as the most comprehensive book documenting the fascinating and intricate world of toy cameras.


David Burnett

In a world of fancy electronic camereas, which do everything but aim themselves for you, it's a breath of fresh air to get back to 'real' photography with the Holga.  You have to make all the decisions about what you are going to shoot, nothing automatic, although after a very short time, you begin to feel the camera is really a part of you.

David Burnett launched his photographic career in 1967 as an intern at Time Magazine while still earning a degree in political science at Colorado College. He went to Vietnam as a freelance photographer in 1970 where Time magazine regularly published his pictures.  In Vietnam he also worked for LIFE (the weekly) until if ceased publication in 1972 then joined the French agency Gamma before co-founding Contact Press Images in New York in 1976.  In his forty years of photographing he has worked in some 80 countries, producing work for TIME, Fortune, National Geographic, and the New York Times.  His Holga photograph of Al Gore in the 2000 Presidential campaign won First Prize in the Campaign category in the White House News Photographers “Eyes of History” contest.  He continues to use Holga cameras while simultaneously using digital cameras costing  hundreds of times more.


Tammy Cromer Campbell

"Her Holga images contain all the original light streaks, lens flares, vignetting and distortions of classic Holga photography... Holga is key to her work."


Tammy CromerCampbell is an award winning American photographer based in Texas. She is equally well known for her work as a documentary photographer and as a public speaker on environmental issues. In 2006, her first book was published titled, "Fruit of the Orchard: Environmental Justice in East Texas". All the images in the book are photographed with a Holga camera, except for the very first image of Jeremy. In 2009 she received first prize under entertainment and culture at the Green Dot Awards. Fruit of the Orchard is a Blue Earth Alliance sponsored project. She serves on the Executive Board of the Texas Photographic Society. Her work is in many public and private collections.


Taiju Fubuki

"The camera creates a sense of flow from the center of the image towards the periphery. This is part of the essence of Holga, and something that raises Holga photographs to the level of art".


Taiju Fubuki is a photographic artist, gallery owner and founder of the Holga Kai (Holga Club), an association of photographers in Japan with more than 2000 members. Starting out as a cameraman discovered the Holga in 1999.


He has had numerous exhibitions, and lectures widely about photography photography at various institutions in Japan. In 2009 he created the title shots for the popular Japanese TV series "Naniwa no Hana" with his Holga.



Teru Kuwayama

"I've taken this camera to the far ends of the earth, subjected it to deserts, mountains, and jungles, and it remains the most reliable tool I've worked with. In its absolute simplicity, it has given me a freedom to operate, both physically and psychologically, and it has made me a better photographer."


Teru Kuwayama is a photojournalist and a humanitarian activist. A native New Yorker, he travels extensively in search of challenging locations. He works frequently in Afghanistan and Pakistan. His dramatic and compelling images are showcased in exhibitions around the world, and in global publications such as Time and Newsweek.


Pauline St. Denis

“Holga has been my muse and my inspiration for over 20 years. I love the camera because it imposes no limitations in regards to frame or creativity. Unlike many modern cameras the Holga doesn’t think for you. It is a vehicle for your vision. With some mental muscle you can begin to understand what the Holga offers.”


Pauline St. Denis shoots with color transparency film, but only advances the film partially to create over-lapping exposures. Her work captures the ethereal quality of light, movement and time. Her pictures are kinetic, energetic and highly stylized. She demonstrates Holga’s upbeat and energetic capabilities. Pauline St. Denis is a commercial photographer based in New York. She has been shooting photographs for over the past 20 years. She is also a live action director.


Harvey Stein

"The simplicity of using the Holga frees me from worrying about manipulating cameras controls and encourages spontaneity and immediacy. The camera makes photographic seeing more direct, without the machine to think about."


Harvey Stein is a professional photographer, teacher, lecturer, and author based in New York. He frequently lectures on photography both in the US and abroad. His photographs have been widely exhibited in the US and in Europe. His photographs are on display in more than 50 permanent collections including many renowned museums around the globe.


Rebecca Tolk

"It is through my photography I find that I am best able to express the respect and fascination I feel for the natural world as the Holga lens enables me to show what I feel when I'm in nature, not just what I see."


Educated at the University of Delaware and Northern Virginia Community College, Rebecca Tolk creates fine art photography for public and private collectors. Her highly personal work naturally lends itself to Holga, embracing its lack of technology and irregularities as both beautiful and distinctive.


For Immediate Release: Contact: Tammy Cromer-Campbell

April 19, 2009 or 903.236.4686


Kilgore Rangerette photographs by O. Rufus Lovett and Longview's ArtWalk !


Longview, TX - April 19, 2009- Kilgore Rangerettes, photographs by O. Rufus Lovett opens May 7, from 5-8 pm with gallery talk at 6:30 at TCC PHOTO | GALLERY 207 N. Center St. Longview, TX . While you are downtown enjoy Longview's ArtWalk that is going on the same night. The exhibit is up through June 26, 2009. 


Kilgore Rangettes

Whether she knows it or not, every girl who has ever dreamed of taking her place in a line of high-kicking dancers on a football field at halftime has been inspired by the Kilgore College Rangerettes, the world's first precision dance drill team. Founded in Kilgore, Texas, in 1939-1940 by the incomparable Gussie Nell Davis, the Rangerettes have performed for national and international audiences, appearing frequently at events such as the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade and major football bowl games across the nation, including the New Year's Cotton Bowl Classic in Dallas each year since 1951.


An icon of Americana, the red-white-and-blue clad Rangerettes have drawn the attention of numerous photographers and writers seeking to understand the enduring appeal of a group that some might view as anachronistic. O. Rufus Lovett, a fine art photographer who has taught at Kilgore College for more than thirty years, began photographing the 'Rettes in 1989. His interpretive photo essay in this exhibit expresses his fascination with "the glamour of the Rangerettes' performances juxtaposed with the small-town atmosphere, football turf, metal bleachers, chain-link fences, and asphalt and concrete environment." In Lovett's masterfully composed photographs, the Rangerette performances captivate with their multiplicity of "shapes, patterns, and designs."


While Lovett treats the 'Rettes as an artistic subject, he also captures the esprit de corps that keeps the girls smiling even when they have to march on icy pavement and prompts their mothers to wear T-shirts that proudly proclaim "Rette Mom." An affectionate, yet unsentimental and occasionally irreverent portrait, Kilgore Rangerettes beautifully conveys the timeless quality of this unique subculture of young American womanhood.


Kilgore Rangerettes, the book, published by the University of Texas Press, foreword by Elliott Erwitt and introduction Katy Vine, will be available in the gallery.


About the photographer

O. Rufus Lovett is a nationally acclaimed photographer and author of the book Weeping Mary. His work has received recognition from the prestigious Alfred Eisenstaedt Awards for Outstanding Magazine Photography. In addition to teaching photography at Kilgore College, Lovett works as a fine art and editorial photographer. His photo essays have appeared in Texas Monthly (which first published his Rangerettes photographs), American Photo, Photo Review, LensWork, People, and Gourmet. He has also been profiled in Southern Living.


Longview Art Walk May 7

Art Walk Downtown Longview is a self guided tour of downtown businesses exhibiting and selling art.


Musicians and other performance arts are frequently part of the event.


Art Walk Downtown Longview is a cooperative event among the businesses in downtown Longview who believe in the promotions of art for the benefit of the Longview Community.


Art Walk Downtown Longview happens four times each year. The next scheduled Art Walk is Thursday May 7th from 5:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.


Over 15 venues are participating. Come join the fun !


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Contact: Renee Hawkins 903.7538103

January 27, 2009 Tammy Cromer-Campbell 903.236.4686


Texas Photographic Society 17 National Show

& Downtown Longview’s ArtWalk


Texas Photographic Society 17 National Show opens here at TCC PHOTO | GALLERY February 5, 2009 5 pm - 8pm with downtown Longview's ArtWalk. The show continues until April 24. TCC PHOTO | GALLERY is open Monday - Friday 11am - 6pm and by appointment.


Lisa Sutcliffe associate curator at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art juried the exhibit. Sutcliffe selected 56 images for TPS 17: The National Show. A total of 267 artists submitted 1,872 images for jurying. Entries came from 36 states.


Lisa Sutcliffe said "photography is of particular interest to me because it can be used to record a specific moment in time, as well as to express an artistic vision. In addition, photographs have the power to communicate ideas and emotions in a way that words can never fully translate. From the diverse array of nearly 2,000 submissions, I selected photographs that not only demonstrated a creative vision and unique perspective, but that were also made stronger by their ability to foster a dialogue with the group.  My interest in land use photography informed my choice of pictures that record the changing urban and rural landscape and examine contemporary issues, such as globalization and industrialization. I also took formal comparisons into account, allowing visual interactions to shape the selection of pictures. In a few cases in which an artist submitted a particularly strong body of work, I included more than one picture from the body in order to illustrate the strength of his or her various viewpoints. I invite you to step in and take a closer look."


And the winners are:

Angela Buenning Filo Palo Alto CA First Place

Colleen Mullins Minneapolis MN Second Place

Martin Stupich Albuquerque NM Third Place

Jess Taylor Dugan Cambridge MA Honorable Mention

Beth Kientzle Oakland CA Honorable Mention

Teresa Ollila Lafayette CO Honorable Mention

Brook Reynolds Atlanta GA Honorable Mention

Natalie Young El Segundo CA Honorable Mention


DOWNTOWN LONGVIEW'S ARTWALK:

With 20 venues and the work of lots of artists, there should be art to satisfy everyone’s taste at the winter ArtWalk from 5 to 8 p.m. Thursday, February 5, 2009 in downtown Longview.


“We have so many talented artists in East Texas and this region. Having ArtWalk gives us an excuse to show off their works and gives attendees a chance to buy some pieces they might never see otherwise, said Renee Hawkins, director of Longview Museum of Fine Arts. The other pleasant part is the food and music we serve to celebrate the uniqueness of our downtown area.”


Tammy Cromer-Campbell of TCC PHOTO | GALLERY said, “We are showing the Texas Photographic Society's 17 National Show and there are artist from 36 different states and the juror was Lisa Sutcliffe associate curator at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art."


Forbes and Butler will feature the photography work of Bryan Boyd and Jim Tilley.


Shannon’s Beading basket will be displaying the work of 21 local artists as well as plants from the Longview Bonsai Society. The lineup of artists includes Don Auderer, Anup Bhandari, Gertrude Bisese, Michael Bishop, Jane Minick Cannon, Christine Chandler, Peggy Sue Coston, Tammie Dubose, Phyllis Haase, Reba Hubbard, Jim Hyatt, Varya Ignatchenko, Patsy Irons, Tim Lee, Karen Lowery, James McLemore, Jeff Rushing, Sandra Spann, Jan Statman, David Thomas and Barbara Walls. Several of the artists will be on hand to discuss their work.


Do you want to hear some music? Drop in on the ARC coffee shop they are featuring two bands Silver Lining and Modern Relics all for free !


The Quilter’s Guild has been turning out art of a different sort for years. You can see the beauty of the members’ work and speak to them about it at Regions Bank lobby.


The Longview Museum of Fine Arts will display the art of Amanda Dunbar.


The ArtWalk venues are Forbes & Butler Visual Communications, TCC Photo | Gallery, George Preston Antiques, Crafters Mall, Art Gallery 100 &, Shannon's Beading Basket, Gerald's & Tyler Street Bistro, ARC Coffee Shop, Portraits and More and ParTea Pizazz, Pelaia Law Office, Quilter’s Guild at Regions Bank, The Denim Lounge, Berry's Custom Framing, Li’l Thai House, Gregg County Historical Museum, Summit Club, Longview Museum of Fine Arts, Java Lounge, Salon Pink, and Stir Krazy Kafe.


Plans for future ArtWalks are made for the first Thursday evening of May, September and November. “East Texas will rarely have available so much art for sale from artists with local, national and international reputations as will be available at ArtWalk, 2009” said Cromer-Campbell, founder of the downtown project.


To find out more and download the ArtWalk map go to http://www.artwalklongview.com


New York Photographer Debuts Marilyn Monroe Exhibit in Longview

Mary Ann Lynch Finds Marilyn’s Timeless Appeal Worldwide


Longview, Texas Sept. 25, 2008-- Mary Ann Lynch’s photographic exhibit Marilyn Monroe: More Than You Know freshly illuminates the woman who lived and died in the Hollywood spotlight, and her ever-evolving place in our culture worldwide. Opening at Tammy Cromer-Campbell Photo and Gallery on October 7, 2008, the show will run through January 31, 2009. The gallery will host a reception for the artist during the Second Annual Longview Artwalk, on Thursday,October 16, from 5pm to 8pm; in a featured Artwalk event, Lynch at 6:30pm will do a walk & talk of the show. The more than two dozen photographs include some not previously exhibited as well as a selection from Lynch’s 2005 retrospective, Forever Marilyn: The Enduring Legacy of Marilyn Monroe.


Marilyn Monroe, born Norma Jeane Mortensen on June 1, 1926, would have been 82 this year. Though she died in 1962, she is still very much with us – “and as so much more than a sex goddess or Hollywood legend. She’s a permanent, beloved popular culture icon whose meaning is ever-shifting,” says Lynch. Since 1992 the New York-based photographer has crisscrossed the United States and other continents, photographing hundreds of unique scenes, tableaux and people that reveal the world’s continuing fascination with Monroe. In each image, a photograph or representation of Marilyn is shown in its context, from a cluttered NYC antiques shop; to a backstreet bar in Mexico; to the Mojave Desert, where burlesque star Dixie Evans pays yearly tribute to Marilyn. Especially popular pieces are a closeup of Marilyn with a gloved hand to her face--that Lynch made from old newsreel footage; and a dramatic profile of the shimmering form-fitting dress Marilyn wore when she sang “Happy Birthday Mr. President” to John F. Kennedy at Madison Square Garden in 1962.


Film scholar Gene Brown has written of Lynch’s photographs: “As this work reveals, Marilyn is omnipresent, a sort of Everywoman. How and where she appears in our midst says something about how and where we are. And to look at how we look at her is to see and say something about how we tell our own stories.” With many shows and much acclaim to date, Lynch plans to travel Marilyn Monroe: More Than You Know while editing the larger body of photographs for a book that tells the whole story of her global encounters with the timeless Marilyn Monroe.


ABOUT THE PHOTOGRAPHER A photographer/writer for more than thirty-five years, Mary Ann Lynch has exhibited her photographs widely and received awards from the New York State Council on the Arts, the National Endowment for the Arts, the Chicago Film Festival, the Hawaii Foundation for Culture and the Arts and many other places. Lynch became known as a photographer while living in Hawaii in the 1970s, for her portrait of a native Hawaiian community, Kalapana, A Hawaiian Place.  Since then she has continued to do editorial, documentary, and fine art photography (with a foray into filmmaking); to write about popular culture and the arts, and to appear as visiting lecturer and artist/presenter at various places including New York University, Ohio University, the Chicago Film Festival, the Honolulu Academy of Arts, and the 2008 Society for Photographic Education National Conference in Denver. Since 1982 she has divided her time between New York City and her residence in Greenfield Center, New York.

Marilyn Monroe: More Than You Know /Photographs by Mary Ann Lynch


Mary Ann & Marilyn Lynch never met Marilyn in person, though in her pre-teens she was exposed to her unforgettable onscreen magnetism in the movie Niagara at a local Drive-In Theater. She still has her movie magazines and scrapbooks from the 1950s. At Cornell University Lynch studied American Intellectual History, which was the start of popular culture being taken seriously. After becoming a photographer and seeing Monroe’s image everywhere she went, she felt a new appraisal of Monroe as one the world’s leading popular culture figures was long overdue. Since beginning the work, Marilyn has frequently come to Lynch in her dreams.


Lynch's Marilyn work has been shown in the United States, Germany, Japan and the Czech Republic; and featured in media and publications from New York to Estonia and Spain. Forever Marilyn was awarded honors in the 2005 Lucie/International Photography Awards. The same year Sirius Satellite and Radio Free Europe did programs with Lynch that went out to millions worldwide. A constant stream of emails and letters from Marilyn aficionados from throughout the world reach Lynch every month, with the occasional middle-of-the night call from someone in Europe or Asia.


Selected quotes from press for Mary Ann Lynch’s Marilyn photography and shows

Forever Marilyn: The Enduring Legacy of Marilyn Monroe, 1926-1962. August 2005. John Stevenson Gallery, NYC.

• Celia McGee, New York Daily News Feature Writer: “Lynch has extracted extraordinary images from glimpses of thrift-shop statuettes, old billboards, movie reruns, female impersonators, recent news stories, restaurant signs and endless forms of retro kitsch. She has tracked Marilyn’s shifts from passive pinup to sex goddess to poster-girl for feminism.”

• Tim Anderson, editor Camera Arts magazine (quoted in McGee article above): “Mary Ann has to really care about something before she photographs it. She internalizes it and brings it into her heart, as it were, before her head. Most photographers shoot first from the head.”

Marilyn Monroe: Radiant Image, February 2000. E-3 Gallery, NYC.

• Robert Hicks, The Villager: “For photographer Mary Ann Lynch, no one epitomizes what popular culture can mean to our self-understanding more strongly than Marilyn Monroe.”

• Mila Andre, The New York Daily News. February 2000. “Nearly 38 years after Marilyn Monroe’s death on August 4, 1962, the sexy appeal that surrounded the Hollywood actress lives on in the collective memory of people around the globe. It took photojournalist Mary Ann Lynch to turn that focus into an exhibition.”

The Marilyn Monroe Wall of Fame, June-July 2000. Soho Photo Gallery, NYC. / August 2000. Bellevue Bar, Hell’s Kitchen, NYC.

• Mila Andre, New York Daily News (centerfold article): “It’s the ideal setting for Lynch’s “Wall”—and anyone who enters will immediately feel Monroe’s presence.”

• Clair Sykes, Photo District News: “Shot in locations from Covington, Kentucky to Quito, Equador, her photos reflect, and perpetuate, the phenomenon of Monroe’s all-pervasive iconic stature, and testify to Lynch’s own passion for the person who so influenced her as a budding young woman.”

• Jill Wing, The Saratogian. “Lynch has become Marilyn’s medium of sorts, whose mission is to lift the veil of mystique from her life and allow her photography to tell Marilyn’s story, capturing her as a pop icon and, perhaps, the planet’s most recognized woman.”

Dualities. 1997. Soho Photo Gallery, NYC.

• Robert Hicks, The Villager: “Lynch holds a decidedly different understanding of celebrity from the paparazzi and her approach to capturing what lies beneath the surface of a person tells in her upcoming Soho Photo show “Dualities,” featuring portraits of Marilyn Monroe, the Maharishi, Elvis Presley, Tina Turner, Andy Warhol, Alice Walker, Robert Bly, Keith Haring, and a short-time celebrity, David Allen, a man who lives in a trailer park in Greenfield Center in upstate New York. Lynch likes to photograph celebrities who have touched her life in some way, especially spiritually.”

• Jill Wing, The Saratogian: “Her portfolio seems as much a journal of pop icons—living and dead—as a study of photographic interpretations personalized by the photographer’s darkroom manipulation.”

Marilyn Monroe: The Living Icon. 1996-97. Soho Photo NYC

• Film critic Scott Siegel: “This is a living, breathing spectacle of Americana captured through the images of Marilyn. Extraordinarily impressive stuff. . .a good idea, executed with elan.”

• James Dellaflora, The Villager: “Photographer Mary Ann Lynch is holding a mirror up to society, and we are seeing in the reflection, Marilyn Monroe.”

• Film scholar/author Gene Brown: “One often speaks of images ‘capturing,’ but the ones in this exhibit by Mary Ann Lynch belie that act. This is a compelling meditation about the woman who was, and is, loved as no other woman in contemporary culture. As this show reveals, she is omnipresent, a sort of Everywoman. . . .She is an icon but she is also much more than that. These images of Marilyn really depict something of ourselves, individually and collectively. There is an image of Greta Garbo, but there are images of Marilyn Monroe, which make her the screen onto which we project.”


###



For Immediate Release: Contact: Tammy Cromer-Campbell

August 7, 2008 • 903.236.4686


POWER

Photographs by Tammy Cromer-Campbell

with a selection from

The Gregg County Historical Museum Archive


“As a photographer I feel a responsibility to go beyond mere documentation and presentation to

using my talents and skills to convey messages that need to be heard.”-- Tammy Cromer-Campbell, 2008


Longview, TX, August 7, 2008 – TCC PHOTO | GALLERY is proud to announce the photography exhibition POWER, opening August 12 and on display through September 26, 2008 at the downtown Longview gallery, located at 207 N. Center St. Focusing on both contemporary and historical providers of power in Texas, POWER includes Cromer-Campbell’s images of Texas steam electric stations (some of the largest in the country); the lignite mines that fuel them; Houston's Ship Channel (Texas’s largest clusters of refineries, with low-income housing nestled around them), the Texas Panhandle Wind Farm and select images from the Gregg County Historical Museum's archive.


Cromer-Campbell began her visual investigation culminating to POWER in 2007. Since then, the issues surrounding our country’s need to diversify its power sources in socially and economically acceptable ways have taken center stage, especially with the Presidential election pending in January 2009. “My wish is that the materials in POWER will encourage viewers to reflect on current sources of power, future possibilities, and the need for informed choices.” The images in the show are both color and black and white. To capture the scope and awesome quality of her subjects, she worked with a Nikon digital camera. For intimate and dramatic scenes, she chose the low-tech Holga toy camera. To broaden the context of the coverage of Texas power, Cromer-Campbell includes a fascinating selection of 1930s historic oil field photographs from the archives of the Gregg County Historical Museum. The archival images displayed are those Cromer-Campbell made from scans of the originl 8x10 glass plate negatives.


The educational thrust of POWER is a continuation of Cromer-Campbell’s involvement with social issues and the storytelling power of photography. Her first book, Fruit of the Orchard/Environmental Justice in East Texas (2006), was widely acclaimed for its poignantly honest depiction of the human tragedies that befell the citizenry of Winona, Texas, who lived downwind of a toxic-waste injection-well facility built in 1982. At her March 2008 book signing in Denver at the National Society for Photographic Education, she signed alongside acclaimed Canadian photographer Edward Burtynsky, who recently published his own book of photographs of mines, quarries, oil fields, and more throughout the world. With POWER, Cromer-Campbell adroitly scrutinizes similar subjects in the home state of current President George Bush, a region that can be seen as a microcosm facing what Burtynsky has called “the dilemma of our modern existence. . . a dialogue between attraction and repulsion, seduction and fear.” Texas, and all of the United States, need to become more independent in meeting current and projected power needs. The question is, how? POWER offers a stimulating entrée into this discussion.


The gallery is open Monday – Friday, 11am – 6pm and by appointment. TCC PHOTO | GALLERY is located at 207 N. Center St. and visit the online gallery at http://www.tccphotogallery.com.


ABOUT THE PHOTOGRAPHER: Tammy Cromer-Campbell is an award winning American photographer best known for her work as a social documentary photographer and speaker. Cromer-Campbell received her Associates of Applied Arts degree in commercial photography from Kilgore College, Kilgore, Texas under the direction of O. Rufus Lovett. She continued her education by taking workshops from the masters in photography, such as Arnold Newman, Ruth Bernhard, Michael Kenna, Keith Carter, John Sexton, and others.


In 2006, the University of North Texas Press published her first book, Fruit of the Orchard / Environmental Justice in East Texas. The book received favorable reviews from the Dallas Morning News, Austin American Statesman, PhotoTechniques Magazine, CHOICE, Current Reviews for Academic Libraries, and others. Fruit of the Orchard received an honorable mention for documentary books in the International PX3 Prix De La Photographie Paris. She has received many honors and awards including Blue Earth Alliance’s first ever cash grant, in 1999, for Fruit of the Orchard. Cromer-Campbell’s work has been published in many publications including cover stories for Camera Arts Magazine, Houston Chronicle’s Texas Magazine numerous times, and many others fine publications.


Cromer-Campbell is Vice President Statewide on the Executive Board for the Texas Photographic Society. She served as an Image-maker presenter at the Society for Photographic Educators National Convention, Denver, Colorado in March of 2008. Her first film, Environmental Justice in the USA was included in the Short Films by Texas Filmmakers organized by Southwest Alternate Media Project (SWAMP) at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston’s Brown Auditorium in April 2008. Her work is included in public and private collections internationally such as the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, the Museet for Fotocunst, Belgium, and others.


In 2000, Cromer-Campbell, co-founded Working Effectively for Clean Air Now (WECAN) to educate her community on local air quality issues and continues to work with environmental groups across the country. She photographs from her studio in downtown Longview, Texas and lives with her husband Scott, also a photographer.



MEDIA ADVISORY: CONTACT: Tammy Cromer-Campbell

Monday June 23, 2008 903.236.4686 |


Press Conference Call: New York Photographer Debuts Marilyn Monroe Exhibit in Longview

Mary Ann Lynch Finds Marilyn’s Timeless Appeal Worldwide


WHAT: Press Conference Call announcing a Marilyn Monroe Exhibit in Longview, TX that will be broadcast as a podcast on iTunes and YouTube.com


WHO: Tammy Cromer-Campbell; Photographer, Mary Ann Lynch; and Film Scholar/Author, Gene Brown


WHEN: THURSDAY, June 26th at 1pm CST, 2pm EST, 11am PST


WHERE: Call from any phone 1 724 444-7444 you will be prompted to enter call id: 21471#, then enter 1#

if you are a Talkshoe member enter your PIN. Voip users #: 66.212.134.192


Longview, Texas June 25, 2008-- Mary Ann Lynch’s photographic exhibit Marilyn Monroe: More Than You Know freshly illuminates the woman who lived and died in the Hollywood spotlight, and her ever-evolving place in our culture worldwide. Opening at TCC PHOTO | GALLERY http://www.tccphotogallery.com on October 7, 2008, the show will run through January 31, 2009. The gallery will host a reception for the artist during the Second Annual Longview ArtWalk, on Thursday, October 16, from 5pm to 8pm; in a featured ArtWalk event, Lynch at 6:30pm will do a walk & talk of the show. The more than two dozen photographs include some not previously exhibited as well as a selection from Lynch’s 2005 retrospective, Forever Marilyn: The Enduring Legacy of Marilyn Monroe.


Marilyn Monroe, born Norma Jeane Mortensen on June 1, 1926, would have been 82 this year. Though she died in 1962, she is still very much with us – “and as so much more than a sex goddess or Hollywood legend. She’s a permanent, beloved popular culture icon whose meaning is ever-shifting,” says Lynch. Since 1992 the New York-based photographer has crisscrossed the United States and other continents, photographing hundreds of unique scenes, tableaux and people that reveal the world’s continuing fascination with Monroe. In each image, a photograph or representation of Marilyn is shown in its context, from a cluttered NYC antiques shop; to a backstreet bar in Mexico; to the Mojave Desert, where burlesque star Dixie Evans pays yearly tribute to Marilyn. Especially popular pieces are a closeup of Marilyn with a gloved hand to her face--that Lynch made from old newsreel footage; and a dramatic profile of the shimmering form-fitting dress Marilyn wore when she sang “Happy Birthday Mr. President” to John F. Kennedy at Madison Square Garden in 1962.


Film scholar Gene Brown has written of Lynch’s photographs: “As this work reveals, Marilyn is omnipresent, a sort of Everywoman. How and where she appears in our midst says something about how and where we are. And to look at how we look at her is to see and say something about how we tell our own stories.” With many shows and much acclaim to date, Lynch plans to travel Marilyn Monroe: More Than You Know while editing the larger body of photographs for a book that tells the whole story of her global encounters with the timeless Marilyn Monroe.


ABOUT THE PHOTOGRAPHER A photographer/writer for more than thirty-five years, Mary Ann Lynch has exhibited her photographs widely and received awards from the New York State Council on the Arts, the National Endowment for the Arts, the Chicago Film Festival, the Hawaii Foundation for Culture and the Arts and many other places. Lynch became known as a photographer while living in Hawaii in the 1970s, for her portrait of a native Hawaiian community, Kalapana, A Hawaiian Place. Since then she has continued to do editorial, documentary, and fine art photography (with a foray into filmmaking); to write about popular culture and the arts, and to appear as visiting lecturer and artist/presenter at various places including New York University, Ohio University, the Chicago Film Festival, the Honolulu Academy of Arts, and the 2008 Society for Photographic Education National Conference in Denver. Since 1982 she has divided her time between New York City and her residence in Greenfield Center, New York.


Marilyn Monroe: More Than You Know /Photographs by Mary Ann Lynch


Mary Ann & Marilyn Lynch never met Marilyn in person, though in her pre-teens she was exposed to her unforgettable onscreen magnetism in the movie Niagara at a local Drive-In Theater. She still has her movie magazines and scrapbooks from the 1950s. At Cornell University Lynch studied American Intellectual History, the academic program that was the start of popular culture being taken seriously. After becoming a photographer and seeing Monroe’s image everywhere she went, she felt a new appraisal of Monroe as one the world’s leading popular culture figures was long overdue. Since beginning the work, Marilyn has frequently come to Lynch in her dreams.


Lynch's Marilyn work has been shown in the United States, Germany, Japan and the Czech Republic; and featured in media and publications from New York to Estonia and Spain. Forever Marilyn was awarded honors in the 2005 Lucie/International Photography Awards. The same year XM Satellite Radio and Radio Free Europe did programs with Lynch that went out to millions worldwide. A constant stream of emails and letters from Marilyn aficionados from throughout the world reach Lynch every month, with the occasional middle-of-the night call from someone in Europe or Asia.


Selected quotes from press for Mary Ann Lynch’s Marilyn photography and shows


Forever Marilyn: The Enduring Legacy of Marilyn Monroe, 1926-1962. August 2005. John Stevenson Gallery, NYC.

• Celia McGee, New York Daily News Feature Writer: “Lynch has extracted extraordinary images from glimpses of thrift-shop statuettes, old billboards, movie reruns, female impersonators, recent news stories, restaurant signs and endless forms of retro kitsch. She has tracked Marilyn’s shifts from passive pinup to sex goddess to poster-girl for feminism.”


• Tim Anderson, editor Camera Arts magazine (quoted in McGee article above): “Mary Ann has to really care about something before she photographs it. She internalizes it and brings it into her heart, as it were, before her head. Most photographers shoot first from the head.”

Marilyn Monroe: Radiant Image, February 2000. E-3 Gallery, NYC.


• Robert Hicks, The Villager: “For photographer Mary Ann Lynch, no one epitomizes what popular culture can mean to our self-understanding more strongly than Marilyn Monroe.”


• Mila Andre, The New York Daily News. February 2000. “Nearly 38 years after Marilyn Monroe’s death on August 4, 1962, the sexy appeal that surrounded the Hollywood actress lives on in the collective memory of people around the globe. It took photojournalist Mary Ann Lynch to turn that focus into an exhibition.”

The Marilyn Monroe Wall of Fame, June-July 2000. Soho Photo Gallery, NYC. / August 2000. Bellevue Bar, Hell’s Kitchen, NYC.


• Mila Andre, New York Daily News (centerfold article): “It’s the ideal setting for Lynch’s “Wall”—and anyone who enters will immediately feel Monroe’s presence.”


• Clair Sykes, Photo District News: “Shot in locations from Covington, Kentucky to Quito, Equador, her photos reflect, and perpetuate, the phenomenon of Monroe’s all-pervasive iconic stature, and testify to Lynch’s own passion for the person who so influenced her as a budding young woman.”


• Jill Wing, The Saratogian. “Lynch has become Marilyn’s medium of sorts, whose mission is to lift the veil of mystique from her life and allow her photography to tell Marilyn’s story, capturing her as a pop icon and, perhaps, the planet’s most recognized woman.”

Dualities. 1997. Soho Photo Gallery, NYC.


• Robert Hicks, The Villager: “Lynch holds a decidedly different understanding of celebrity from the paparazzi and her approach to capturing what lies beneath the surface of a person tells in her upcoming Soho Photo show “Dualities,” featuring portraits of Marilyn Monroe, the Maharishi, Elvis Presley, Tina Turner, Andy Warhol, Alice Walker, Robert Bly, Keith Haring, and a short-time celebrity, David Allen, a man who lives in a trailer park in Greenfield Center in upstate New York. Lynch likes to photograph celebrities who have touched her life in some way, especially spiritually.”


• Jill Wing, The Saratogian: “Her portfolio seems as much a journal of pop icons—living and dead—as a study of photographic interpretations personalized by the photographer’s darkroom manipulation.”

Marilyn Monroe: The Living Icon. 1996-97. Soho Photo NYC


• Film critic Scott Siegel: “This is a living, breathing spectacle of Americana captured through the images of Marilyn. Extraordinarily impressive stuff. . .a good idea, executed with elan.”


• James Dellaflora, The Villager: “Photographer Mary Ann Lynch is holding a mirror up to society, and we are seeing in the reflection, Marilyn Monroe.”


• Film scholar/author Gene Brown: “One often speaks of images ‘capturing,’ but the ones in this exhibit by Mary Ann Lynch belie that act. This is a compelling meditation about the woman who was, and is, loved as no other woman in contemporary culture. As this show reveals, she is omnipresent, a sort of Everywoman. . . She is an icon but she is also much more than that. These images of Marilyn really depict something of ourselves, individually and collectively. There is an image of Greta Garbo, but there are images of Marilyn Monroe, which make her the screen onto which we project.”



FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Contact: Tammy Cromer-Campbell

April 13, 2008 903.236.4686 •


Our second Downtown Longview Art Walk is scheduled for Thursday, April 24 from 5-7 pm. We have more than quadruple the number of participating venues. They are:


TCC PHOTO | GALLERY

Longview Museum of Fine Arts

The Gregg County Historical Museum with Trinity's Art and Photograpy classes exhibit

The Longview News Journal

Zowies/DTE Interiors

Art Gallery 100 and Shannon's Beading Basket

Forbes & Butler Visual Communications

Geralds

The Denim Lounge

Barry's Custom Framing

The ARC Coffee Shop

Crafters Mall

That Girl's Boutique

Portraits and More

ParTea Pizazz

George Preston Antiques

Pinks

Journeys


Join the fun and support the Arts !


Here is a link to the Art Walk PSA click here.


HORSE photographs by Dennis Fagan and Downtown Longview’s Art Walk


Longview, TX -HORSE, photographs by Dennis Fagan will be on display from April 24 - June 6, 2008. Purchase a photograph from HORSE and help save a wild horse or burro. Dennis Fagan’s study of the horse as archetype image and symbol are hauntingly beautiful and ethereal.


WHO: .TCC PHOTO | GALLERY, Longview Museum of Fine Arts, Gregg County Historical Museum, and many other downtown merchants are participating with the Downtown Longview’s Spring Art Walk.


WHEN: Thursday, April 24, 2008 from 5 - 7 pm.


WHERE: 207 N. Center St. and other area businesses are participating in downtown Longview.


HORSE was first exhibited as a solo show at the Galveston Arts Center and curated by Clint Willour. Ileana Marcolesco from Spot Magazine said, “Galisteo, perhaps the most intriguing piece in the show features two white Arabians silhouetted and bathed in diffuse light, lovingly seeking for one another at an improbable angle. The well-studied asymmetric composition, obviously taken in stables complete with brick floors, wood post, metallic bars and stone piers, is loaded with emotion. May it be read as a symbol for love reaching across barriers? Together with the form of “organic minimalism,” the main accomplishment of the show was the transmission of a contagious empathy with the living, in a strikingly novel form.”


Fagan says about his work, “ the image and shape of the horse is something mankind has sketched, painted, and carved into walls since the era of cave people in Cantabria, Spain and near Lascauz, France. It is almost as if this shape has been burned into our collective conscious over the generations. From the great paintings within museums to the silhouettes in the classic westerns of John Ford against the sunset, it is a shape we instantly recognize regardless of whether we actually have spent time with horses or ever even touched a horse.”


Dennis Fagan is an award-winning photographer from Austin, Texas who is collected internationally. He has been a featured solo artist at two FotoFests, the only two time winner of the Santa Fe Assignment Earth competition and the subject of several magazine features including Communication Arts, the German magazine ARCHIVE, Houston Center for Photography’s international publication, SPOT, and New York City’s Photo District News. Dennis is also a film director. His images including some from this show are included in the collections of the permanent collections of the Houston Museum of Fine Arts, the University of Texas Harry Ransom Collection, the Witliff Gallery of Southwestern & Mexican Photography, and the Polaroid Collection.


Partial proceeds from print sales will be donated to Texans for Education and Adoption of Mustangs- Least Resistance Training Concepts TEAM-LRTC, a non-profit subsidiary of LRTC, a 501(c)(3) based out of California and Nevada.


TEAM-LRTC has a small wild horse holding and training facility about 35 miles southeast of Austin, where the goal is to bring a few wild horses that need adoptive homes and teach volunteers to gentle and train them. The volunteers learn, the horses learn, and everyone has a good time in the process. Volunteers need not have prior horse experience; and, if they choose, they can ultimately become active members of the LRTC Wild Horse Mentors program, assisting new wild horse and burro adopters across Texas. With some basic training, the project horses will be more adoptable and more likely to succeed in their new homes.


Texans have adopted more than 16,000 wild horses and burros since the US Bureau of Land Mgmt. adoption program began, more than any state except California. Still, the number of wild horses in various government holding corrals is staggering and growing. While TEAM-LRTC can only take in a handful of animals at a time, it is our hope that we can prepare our volunteers to be good adopters and qualified mentors, helping to increase the number and success rate of Texas adoptions.


Least Resistance Training Concepts (LRTC) is a non-profit corporation for the purpose of promoting humane and effective techniques for gentling and training horses. While one of LRTC's primary focal points is to improve the quality of life for adopted wild horses and burros by providing practical training information and free mentoring assistance, our intended beneficiaries include all horses, regardless of origin, as well as their owners.


###


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: CONACT: TAMMY CROMER-CAMPBELL

January 8, 2008 903.2364686


TCC PHOTO | GALLERY invites you to our upcoming exhibition Photographs by Polly Chandler. The exhibit is up from January 19 – March 28, 2008. Join us for the artist reception Saturday, January 19, 2008 from 6-8 pm.


Polly Chandler is a young and exceptionally talented up-and-coming photographer whose work has been exhibited from throughout the U.S. and Europe in more than 3-dozen juried exhibitions in the past few years. Chandler grew up in Southern Illinois and graduated with an MFA in photography from Southern Illinois University. Her evocative portraits have received international accolades and awards and were recently published in Photo District News, American Photo and B&W Magazine.


The images in this exhibit are from Chandler’s Emotional Narratives. Her dream-like portraits are created with a 4x5 large format camera using Polaroid positive negative film and printed using traditional darkroom techniques. She editions her work in two sets of 25: a warm tone silver gelatin limited edition and traditional silver gelatin limited edition.


Silvershotz Magazine recently wrote: "Polly has succeeded in developing a unique portrait style in this [series of narratives]. The subjects never actually engage with the viewer. They appear quiet, reflective, somber, inhibited and shy that someone else might be looking at them and sharing a sense of their private life, private thoughts and emotions. Their isolation is almost complete as the images are void of the presence of other humans. Standing alone in their environment they ask you, the viewer - to be quiet, come no closer, but share in their space."


Collectors, this is an artist to watch and collect. Order yours today !


TCC PHOTO | GALLERY is located at 207 N. Center St. in downtown Longview, TX 75601 and you may also purchase safely and securely online at http://www.tccphotogallery.com




FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Contact: Tammy Cromer-Campbell

October 10, 2007 903.236.4686 —


TCC PHOTO | GALLERY announcesthe Blue Earth Alliance Exhibit - “Photographs that make a difference”

Longview, TX Blue Earth Alliance is a Seattle based organization whose mission is to raise awareness about endangered

cultures, threatened environments and social concerns through photography. By supporting the power of photographic

storytelling, we motivate society to make positive change. This exhibit includes work from around the world, from the

deserts of Africa, melting Icebergs in Greenland, Yellowstone to Yukon, Pacific Native Americans, zoo animals from

around the world, the vanishing truck farmers, and environmental injustices issues from Northeast Texas to across the USA.


The exhibit is up from October 13 – December 31, 2007. Artist reception and Downtown Longview's first Art Walk

October 27, 2007 from 6-8 8pm at TCC PHOTO | GALLERY, 207 N. Center St., Longview, TX, 75601. Artist included in the exhibit are Phil Borges, Camille Seaman, Florian Schultz, Janis Miglavs, Rebecca Norris Webb, Perry Dilbeck and Tammy Cromer-Campbell. Books and fine art photographs and books will be available from these projects. Portions of the sales goes to Blue Earth Alliance.


About the work and the artists:

Phil Borges

Enduring Spirit

Phil Borges is exhibiting prints from his Enduring Spiritproject and book. In 1998 Borges partnered with Amnesty

International to create an exhibit and book celebrating the 50th anniversary of the signing of the Universal Declaration of

Human Rights. Here are some of the people he photographed and interviewed. Some are experiencing their first contact

with the outside world; some have survived exploitation and repression for years; some whose cultures have been decimated

and are attempting a comeback—people trying to hold on to their cultural identities at the edge of the world.


Phil Borges’ photographs are collected and exhibited in museums and galleries worldwide. His award-winning books

have been published in four languages and in 1998 he was presented the Photo Media Magazine "Photoperson of the

Year" award. In December, 2003 Phil was honored with the Humanitarian Award, receiving the Lucie at the 1st Annual

International Photography Awards. In 2005 he was named a Giraffe Hero for his humanitarian work. Phil teaches and lectures

internationally and is co-founder of Blue Earth Alliance, a 501c3 that sponsors photographic projects focusing on

endangered cultures and threatened environments.


Camille Seaman

The Last Iceberg

Camille Seaman, newest Blue Earth Alliance photographer is showing The Last Iceberg. The Last Icebergis one piece

of a larger project entitled “Melting Away” which documents the polar regions of our planet, their environments, life forms,

history of human exploration and the communities that work and live there.


Nick Cave once sang, “All things move toward their end.” Icebergs give the impression of doing just that, in their

individual way much as humans do; they have been created of unique conditions and shaped by their environments to

live a brief life in a manner solely their own. Some go the distance traveling for many years slowly being eroded by time

and the elements; others get snagged on the rocks and are whittled away by persistent currents. Still others dramatically

collapse in fits of passion and fury. The Last Iceberg chronicles just a handful of the many thousands of icebergs that are

currently headed to their end. I approach the images of icebergs as portraits of individuals, much like family photos of

my ancestors. I seek a moment in their life in which they convey their unique personality, some connection to our own

experience and a glimpse of their soul which endures. These images were made in both the Arctic regions of Svalbard, Greenland, Iceland and Antarctica.


Biography

Camille Seaman (Shinnecock Tribe b.1969) is an Award winning American photographer best known for her

evocative Polar images. Capturing the essence of awe and beauty of indigenous cultures and environments,

in a sophisticated documentary/fine art tradition is her trademark. Camille has traveled to over 30 countries

creating timeless images. Seaman’s work has been exhibited and published in magazines internationally.

Seaman's career was launched when she traveled north to the Arctic in 2003 where she made stunning

photographs of the little known island of Svalbard and its Arctic environment. She often teaches workshops on

Photography and self-publishing.


Camille shoots both in digital and film in multiple formats. Based in California, Seaman is also the

co-founder of Fastback Creative Books a company with US locations offering photographers the opportunity to

create unique published-looking books of their work.


Florian Schultz

Yellowstone to Yukon

The Yellowstone-to-Yukon region is one of the last intact mountain ecosystems in the world. Spanning nearly 750,000

square miles, it stretches from mountain peaks to river valleys, across two large swaths of southern Canada, and the

northern United States.


Most people envision the region as an endless, breathtaking, wild land. In reality, it has been sliced up by highways and

sectioned into towns and other isolated pockets of land, resulting in less wildlife and a loss of biodiversity. Scientist and

conservationists understand the importance of reconnecting these isolated preserves and the urgency to conserve key

habitats to ensure a functioning web of life - accommodating both human growth needs and key migration corridors.

Through Yellowstone to Yukon, Florian Schulz aids the fight to preserve North America's wild heart.


Biography

Florian Schulz is a professional nature and wildlife photographer based in southern Germany whose striking images

have garnered international recognition. Florian Schulz has become a world renowned, award-winning photographer dedicated

to the support of conservation efforts to protect endangered ecosystems. Sponsored by the Blue Earth Alliance,

his book “Yellowstone to Yukon – Freedom to Roam”, (The Mountaineers Books) was awarded by the Independent Book

Publishers (IPPY Awards) one of the “Top Ten Outstanding Books of the Year” under the category: “Most Likely to Save

the Planet”. Several images selected from his book are on display today in the American Museum of Natural History

under the collective exhibit: Yellowstone to Yukon. Florian Schulz is the youngest Founding Member of the newly founded

International League of Conservation Photographers (ILCP) which empowers conservation-minded photographers to

use their talents to help create an understanding for the natural world.


Janis Miglavs

Africa's Undiscovered Myths: Searching for Man's Original Stories

Some 150,000 years ago a small band of humans left Africa to populate the earth, according to DNA research and

archeological finds. In 1999, I began my search for myths and primordial dreams that could link us to that time before

the African exodus. I visited the most remote, least-touched tribes in Africa, where I found oral stories, legends and

archetypal dreams full of mystery and hidden meanings. As I listened to the body-painted warriors, elders and storytellers,

I wondered if their narratives held Da Vinci Code-like secrets that we have lost?


Through photography, photo illustrations, journal entries, and narratives, Africa's Undiscovered Myths recounts five

Gilgamesh-like journeys among of Africa's remotest tribes to discover if their ancient legends just might be the oldest stories

known to man and the actual foundation for our current belief systems. Amazingly, anthropologists say that I am the only person to have ever recorded these narratives passed down through uncounted generations.


Biography

Janis was born in 1948 in a displaced person's camp in Germany. He learned firsthand the importance of culture and the

ripping pain of its loss when Communists invaded Latvia and tried to erase his homeland's way of life._ Eventually he

immigrated to the United States.


An Oregonian since 1982, Janis has photographed landscapes, architecture, and indigenous tribes worldwide._His work

has appeared in National Geographic, Travel & Leisure, Sunset and many other publications. He also does advertising

and commercial work for corporate clients like Hewlett Packard, Deloitte & Touche, Sheraton Hotels, Oregon Tourism,

and Nikon.


Rebecca Norris Webb

The Glass Between Us

In 1998, Rebecca Norris Webb wandered into the Coney Island aquarium, and spotted a white beluga whale soaring

high above the heads of visitors, who were reflected in the glass tank._ Thus began her exploration of the complex and

vulnerable relationship that exists between people and animals in cities. Since then, Webb has photographed in some 25

cities around the world.


Webb captures not only the animal in its urban habitat, but the reflection of onlookers as they try to get a little bit closer,

creating a richly layered image where the captive animals equally captivate their audience, who peer into the glass with

complex and sometimes contradictory emotions: wonderment, concern, delight, empathy, humor, sadness, protectiveness.

Her photographs convey both a sense of connection and isolation, intimacy and distance.


_Ultimately, I feel fortunate to share the planet with such marvelous creatures,_ says Webb. _Yet, the question still

lingers: For how much longer?_

www.theglassbetweenus.com


Biography

Rebecca Norris Webb, originally a poet and journalist, had her first NYC solo exhibition at Ricco Maresca Gallery in

2006, the same year her first book, The Glass Between Us, was published. Her series has also been included in several

group exhibitions, including "Why Look at Animals?" at the George Eastman House Museum of Photography. Currently,

she's working on a series of photographs in the American West called, My Dakota. Rebecca edits books with her husband

and creative partner, Alex Webb, and teaches photography workshops with him around the world.


Perry Dilbeck

Truck Farmers, The Last Harvest

A culmination of more than ten years of work, Perry Dilbeck’s series of black and white photographs documents the livelihoods

of Southern truck farmers whose lifestyles are quickly fading away. Truck farmers are small, independent farmers

who typically own less than forty acres of land and who often sell their fruits and vegetables at small farmers markets or

at a roadside stand. Due to the exponential growth in population in the South and the growth in the large-scale commercial

farming industry, the business of truck farmers has nearly been destroyed.


Dilbeck felt compelled to create a tribute to the surviving workers of the land by documenting their lives with a Holga

camera. He built close relationships with each farmer, and carried a recorder with him to document their stories. Unlike

other photographers who often portray the hurt and despair of farmers, Dilbeck strived to display the wonderful pride and

dignity these farmers exude in their daily lives.


Biography

Perry Dilbeck’s fine art photographs have appeared in numerous magazines both in the U.S. and abroad. Dilbeck has

had dozens of group and solo exhibitions throughout the United States. His work resides in permanent collections in

Texas and Georgia. He was named Georgia Author of the Year for The Last Harvest in 2007 and The National

Geographic Society’s All Roads Photography Program honored The Last Harvest body of work in 2006. Dilbeck was a

Vision 2003 Award Winner from the Santa Fe Center for Visual Arts. He has been a full time photographer instructor for

nine years at The Art Institute of Atlanta.


Tammy Cromer-Campbell

Fruit of the Orchard | Environmental Justice in East Texas to Environmental Justice in the USA.

This is an extended essay, photographed with a Holga camera, on a small African-American community in Texas—their

struggles, some deaths, and ultimate triumph, with a toxic waste facility in Winona, TX.


With “Environmental Justice in the USA, “I continue to photograph with the Holga camera, but include audio and video

clips of communities impacted by environmental injustice nationwide. I start with Winona, TX and bring the story up to date. Then I'll explore DeBerry, TX, New Orleans, LA; Seattle, WA; and Houston, TX ship channel, all of whom have offered me welcome, through my video and photographic essays, to afford the opportunity to promote sustainability of the environment. The work will be primarily in low-to-moderate income communities among whom minorities have been the most egregious victims of environmental and social injustice.”


Biography

Tammy Cromer-Campbell received her Associates degree from Kilgore College, Kilgore, Texas in 1986. The UNT Press

recently published Fruit of the Orchard/Environmental Justice in East Texas (FOTO). She has received awards including

Blue Earth Alliance’s first ever cash grant in 1999. Her work has been published in many publications including cover

stories for Camera Arts Magazine’s February 2001 issue, Houston Chronicle’s Texas Magazine numerous times, and others.

Her work is included in public and private collections internationally. FOTO reviews appeared in the Dallas Morning

News, PhotoTechniques Magazine, and others. Most recently, the work received honorable mention in the international

PX3 Prix, Paris.

TCC PHOTO | GALLERY | 207 N. Center St. | Longview | TX | 75601 | 903.236.4686 |


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NEWSROOM Media Advisory:


Evelyn’s An exhibition of photographs by Scott Canterbury Campbell



WHAT: Eveylyn’s An exhibition of photographs by Scott Canterbury Campbell

This exhibition is a tribute to a Mom, revealed through reminisant still- lifes by an adoring son.


Live conference call for media and interested parties with photographer

Scott Canterbury Campbell.


WHEN: Join the live, phone-based media event (with Q&A. You have two opportunities to participate

• 2 pm CST Monday May 7, 2007 and

• 10 am CST, Tuesday May 8, 2007

Call1-605-475-8515 The room number is: 5218228


The calls will be recorded for a podcast and will be distributed on iTunes and youtube.com

WHO: Speakers will include

Renowned Photographer/Author Keith Carter

Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center: Curator Roy Flukinger

Photographer/Author Tammy Cromer-Campbell.


ABOUT: Evelyn’s:


After my mother passed away in 1999, her house and the items within revealed a resonance of her life to me. Photographing became a therapeutic way of saying goodbye.


On December 6, 1999, I was forced to say goodbye to the greatest woman that ever walked the face of the earth. I was alone, holding her hand as I did many times before. A powerful, magical presence always radiated from within her soul that could scare off any dilemma of mine. This just could not be real. Mom did not embrace death, and to me she was the idealism of a giving life. A dedicated teacher, her resonance left several challenging tasks for me to complete in my life.


For the next year and a half, the care of my disabled father became my brother’s and my responsibility, as Dad

ould not manage by himself. My wife and I took Dad in to our home in Longview, Texas. As often as we could, my father and I would make the 90-mile journey through Northeast Texas to their house in the small farming community of Clarksville. The visits to the house gave him a sense of place during a very uncertain, upside-down time in his life. His wish was to keep the house intact, as if he and Mom still lived there. Within those walls Dad allowed time to stand mysteriously still.


Comments about the work:


Scott Campbell applied his experience as a commercial table-top catalog photographer to a subject much closer to his heart, by photographically preserving the artifacts of his mother’s life. An intimate and poignant portrait of Evelyn, this photo essay quietly looks - really looks - at the things that describe us in our daily lives. Scott’s work has caused us to look at the “everyday stuff of everydayness” with a different eye.

Brooks Jensen

Publisher of Lenswork


“These photographs are a lyrical elegy to Evelyn Campbell and serve as an extended portrait of her. We sense her continuing presence through her possessions — her brush and mirror, coin purse, keepsake spoons, andcake taker. These evocative still lifes are imbued with a sense of memory and personal history.”

Jean Caslin

Art Consultant


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